I read this book before reading The Rooster Bar by same author. If you haven't read The Rooster Bar yet, it's about the high cost of law school tuition and three pals who scam the scammers. Reflecting back on reading Camino Island which is about the "fictionalized" Princeton University owning original manuscripts of F. Scott Fitzgerald worth millions of dollars, guarded and kept under lock and key, and although I realize the book is fiction, if universities have become serious collectors of rare pieces of literature locked away where very few are allowed to peruse, what do these collections benefit the average college student? Perhaps we've discovered a connection (one of just many) to the outrageous tuition challenge. Spoiler Alert: The book collector who buys the stolen manuscripts gets off scott-free, the University absorbs the loss along with the insurance company, and ultimately the cost is passed on to consumers . . . where has that happened before? I'm becoming less and less of a Grisham fan with each book. I actually finished the book but it was a disappointment. My advice to Grisham is . . . come back to the typewriter and exorcise the ghostwriters!

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